HSE may extend ‘home from home’ for elderly

HSE may extend ‘home from home’ for elderly

I was browsing the internet and came across this article. Very interesting and is already in operation in some towns in Ireland.

By Claire O’Sullivan  of the Irish Examiner Reporter on Monday, November 14, 2016

The expansion of a little- known scheme where families are paid to take in elderly people so they can live their lives in a ‘home away from home’ is being considered by the HSE.

The scheme ‘can be of great benefit to the host family and the older person’, said Mervyn Taylor of Sage.

Under the existing ‘boarding out’ scheme, the HSE pays the homeowner an amount of not more than half the weekly rate of the State pension. In addition, the older person pays an additional sum agreed with the HSE and the house owner.

The scheme operates in Donegal, Mayo, Longford/Westmeath, Louth, and Meath and approximately 50 older people avail of it every year. Last year, up to 15 households took part in the scheme at a cost of €320,000.

The householder must “provide suitable and sufficient care, nutritious and varied food, and adequate attendance, having regard to the needs of the person”.

Under its 2016 service plan, the HSE has set up a working group to review the scheme and make recommendations “on the potential for developing and extending the scheme nationally as an additional option of care services for older people”.

The working group will look at international best practice in the area and look at identifying a best model of care for an expanded service.

Mervyn Taylor, manager of Sage, the support and advocacy service for older people, said the ‘home from home’ scheme offers “choice and flexibility and has very many positives for older people and for families”.

“We need a wider range of options for older people and this is one innovative scheme that already exists and should be nurtured,” said Mr Taylor.

“It’s an option that keeps elderly people who do not have a high level of care needs in the community. Once it has light, but sensitive oversight, it can be of great benefit to the family and the older person.”

The working group will also review the 1993 boarding out regulations, identify the scope to expand the scheme to other Community Health Organisation areas, identify the requirements and costs of an expanded scheme.

It is anticipated that the working group will submit its recommendations to the HSE Head of Operations & Service Improvement Services for Older People before end of the year.

FIVE STEPS TO A HEALTHY BRAIN

FIVE STEPS TO A HEALTHY BRAIN

Challenge Your Brainimages

Being smart is more than facts and knowledge, it’s being resourceful and insightful and challenging your brain in different ways. Don’t get stuck in a brain rut, learn something new, you might discover a talent you never thought you had.

EXERCISE
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Exercise helps to form connections between brain cells and it also helps us to de-stress. You don’t have to join a gym or become a marathon runner, 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise five days a week will keep your brain healthy and happy and you’ll also feel great.

Eat a Healthy Diethappy-healthy-body-clipart-1

A healthy diet is really important for a healthy and happy brain. Fruit, vegetables and fish are all great healthy options.

Take Care of Your Heart

Clipart Illustration of a Healthy Red Heart Running Past

What is good for your heart is also good for your brain. On your next visit to your GP get your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels checked. Maintain a healthy weight, know your BMI and if you smoke, try an give them up.

Stay Socially Connectedgroup-of-friends-hugging-clipart-clipart-panda-free-clipart-images-bzbwel-clipart

Connecting and interacting with people helps to grow new connections in your brain.Meet friends and family for a cup of coffee or other activities you enjoy doing together.

Dementia Ireland

DigiNanna is back in college

DigiNanna is back in college

DigiNanna is back in college to finish her course in Digital Marketing. I will be attending class two nights a week in the National College of Ireland until Christmas but have to work on assignments afterwards until the end of January before I can breath and say I have finished.  I hope to  graduate next November 2017 all going well. This will be my second graduation in 3 years.  I am a very lucky Nanna to have the opportunity to do this.

This semester we are studying two modules which are Social Medial and Public Relations and the other one is Technology and User Experience UX.  I am enjoying both modules and learning new things all the time. 

Time Management and organisation are keys to successful learning.  It just takes a little while to get back into  college mode.  It is now a couple of weeks, so I can safely say I am in the thick of it.  Part of our weekly homework is blogging on what we have learned and what we see all around us in relation to our course.  It as been fun and you can follow my blog about that on my personal page click here    

This is all relatively new to me and blogging is good for the soul.  You too could do this.  WordPress is a great site to get you started – see here for yourself  get started

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I also use Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Instagram. I have tried Snapchat for research purposes for college, but I have not got the hang of it yet.  My adult children are very nimble on Snapchat and have great fun making funny photos to send to me especially of my 3 grandchildren.  They also use it to keep up with their  friends and cousins some of whom live abroad.  Of course, there is the app that is ‘the next best thing since sliced bread’.   WhatsApp.  This is the most used app within my family circle.  My parents who are new to phone apps love this as they can get messages and photos from all the family free of charge. 

Facebook is a great tool for keeping in contact with family and friends especially those overseas or those that you only meet from time to time. You can set up private groups for family/friends and share stories, photos, updates.  I have a few groups, family, school friends, classmates from two different colleagues.  There are also groups for like minded people and its good to see what else is out there.  You are always sure to pick up a tip or two during your browse through Facebook.

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I have been at the computer for a while now and its time to unwind with a soap or two on TV.  I hope that I may have inspired someone to give social media  a go and let me know what you are up to so that DigiNannaDublin can follow you.

growing-old-gracefully

 

DigiNannaDublin’s First Event

DigiNannaDublin’s First Event

Yesterday Wednesday 28th September 2016 saw DigiNannaDublin host their 1st event.  It was for Positive Ageing Week with Age Action Ireland and was held in Hobart’s Cafe in Ranelagh, Dublin 6.  DigiNanna Dublin chatted with some great characters over coffee and a scone. 

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We met the owners Karen and Deborah who are two very hard-working ladies who are always smiling.  The description on their Twitter page @hobartscafe  is  – We serve traditional breakfast all day and Healthy Lunch specials. In Ranelagh we open 7 days a week from 8-4. Everything is home-cooked, served with a smile! 

Liz from Antica Venezia Restaurant in Ranelagh  joined us for coffee and told us of the history of their restaurant.  The description on their Twitter page @AnticaVeneziaD6  is – Antica Venezia established in 1997 and is still run by its founders. We preserve the tradition of excellence in Italian Food and in service.

A number of regulars called into the cafe for their ‘usual’ but other new customers responded to the Facebook posts and Twitter tweets.  This demonstrated the power of social media exchange and interaction of DigiNannaDublin.  

Saoirse from @elderhomeshare   called in as she was in the area distributing leaflets about Elder Homeshare which is a resource for sourcing & vetting tenants for older home-owners with a room to rent creating positive cross generational living.

We also chatted to Grace who is a breath of fresh air.  She is a retired lady who now works tirelessly at making Ranelagh look beautiful with boxes flowing over with flowers.  She is also involved in the Tidy Towns and was delighted with the work that has been done in Ranelagh.  She is also involved in the local Arts Centre.  

Caroline who is a local artist chatted to us about her work and Drew who also works at the Arts Centre called in for a coffee and a chat.  Paddy and Catherine were reminiscing about how they met 53 years ago in Ranelagh and John told a story about how he came shopping in Ranelagh on the back of his mothers bike.

Positive Ageing week has many events this week in Ireland and hopefully you have or will be able to partake in one in your area.  Even though this week is marked for Positive Ageing every day should be celebrated in this way.  

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Older Generation and Technology – An article from the NEW YORK TIMES

Older Generation and Technology – An article from the NEW YORK TIMES

 

When Facebook was born in 2004, the oldest baby boomers were in their late 50s, and older members of the silent generation were reaching their early 80s. If you thought they were going to sit back and let gifs, emojis and status updates pass them by, you were wrong, according to new research.
In a survey of over 350 American adults between the ages of 60 and 86, researchers at Pennsylvania State University found that older people enjoy the same things their younger counterparts do: using Facebook to bond with old friends and develop relationships with like-minded people. They also like to keep tabs on their loved ones.
These motivations sound awfully similar to those that attracted college students, Facebook’s first colonizers, to the platform — save for one key detail. For many surveyed, seeing photos and video of grandchildren were a powerful lure, according to S. Shyam Sundar, a co-director of the Media Effects Research Laboratory at Penn State, who worked on the survey.
“That was primarily the biggest driver,” Mr. Sundar said, “and the ease with which they can maintain what I call social surveillance, and keep an eye on what’s going on with their children and grandchildren.”
I decided to add my own survey to the research by interviewing my 61-year-old father, Richard, who has had me under Facebook surveillance recently.
From an academic-research standpoint, he’s on the younger side of being old — and, like many his age, he feels younger. He successfully avoided social media for years. But after returning home to Indiana from my wedding a couple of months ago, he wanted to be better at keeping in touch with family and with the friends he remembers from my childhood. He told me over Facebook chat (naturally) that his curiosity about what others were up to was his main motivator in finally learning to navigate Facebook.
Now, like the rest of us, he’s hooked. He’s had a ball wishing happy birthday to my friends, commenting on our status updates and sharing his own life’s highlights. He still signs comments with his initials, but he’s learning. He has even joined a Facebook group for local music enthusiasts, sharing memories about his favorite concert (The Beatles in 1964) and photos of his drum set.
“Initially, I think I viewed it as something ‘newfangled’ that only the younger computer-generation used,” he said. “Then, like probably everybody, I started to become hooked as I saw just how expansive it is, and how much it seems to literally touch so many lives.”
The findings might not come as any surprise to countless members of the digital-savvy generations who have watched (and cringed) as their parents fell in love with Facebook, but researchers say the online lives of older adults, who are a part of the fastest-growing demographic on social media, are much more mysterious than the much-scrutinized behaviors of younger generations.
As Facebook continues to be a bigger part of American life, the ever-growing population of older Americans is figuring out how to adapt. As people grow older, peer communication through chatting, status updates and commenting will become more important, Ms. Sundar said, and Facebook will need to adapt tools that are suited for an aging audience.
Research shows that older Americans are living longer than previous generations, and many of them prefer to stay in their homes, often called aging in place. Independent seniors will need to learn to use digital tools that will keep them engaged — and allow them to reach out for help if they need it, Mr. Sundar said
“The whole idea is to kind of give people a chance to be social when there are physical constraints,” Mr. Sundar said, “Create a virtual retirement community, if you will.”
Update: In reaction to this story, several readers shared stories of their own parents and grandparents on Facebook. Here are a few highlights:
• “My grandfather writes LOL on everything. But the funny thing is that he thinks that it stands for lots of love. My wife’s grandfather is the best, he literally writes ‘LIKE’ instead of liking the post.” – Brendan McCaffrey
• “When I was tagged in a lot of pictures from an all-day drinking event and my Grandmother posted on my wall ‘Do you ever have time to study?’ THANKS GRANDMA!” – Brogan Bunnell
• “I had to unfriend my mom on Facebook because she ‘over-comments’ on every single post. I’ve explained to her in person that this is why we aren’t friends on Facebook. I made a post the other day and accidentally had the privacy setting set to public. My mom texted me her comments on my post by phone, and then sent a follow up text to clarify that she sent the text because she can’t comment on my post on Facebook, and follows it up with another Facebook friend request. She totally missed the point.” – Aimee Myers Lynch
• “Someone I know meant to PM his son his tax return, but instead publicly posted it and tagged them in it.” – Moody Mohamed
LINK TO NEW YORK TIMES STORY IS HERE     http://nyti.ms/23y22KZ